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We lucky few.

Where to start…
I just wanted to say thank you, the things all of you have done changed the world. If it wasn’t for all of you to fight this war I can’t even imagine what would have happend. You know I live in Holland and all of you were there when we needed you. I keep saying it, THANK YOU. All of you are MY HEROES! 

—Chantee, Holland

My letter to Frank Perconte.

My name is Erica, I am 22 years old and I live in Chicago. I am writing to you because I have always wanted to.

I imagine you have heard this often, from people of all ages, races, and walks of life. But I must tell you now that you and the rest of the band of brothers have changed my life.

I am a graduate student, and I had been very unhappy in my program for a long time. I was at a loss as to what to do. Finally, after watching Band of Brothers for the millionth time, I knew what I wanted. I wanted to study stories of men like you and Easy Company. I wanted to learn their stories and the lessons they had to teach future generations, and pass on those lessons to my future children.

So last week I informed my advisor that I intend to quit the program and apply to graduate school to study history, specializing in World War II. It is going to be tough – lots of tests to take and personal statements to write – but I am much happier now and I have Easy Company to thank. Your story helped me realize what I truly want out of life.

Ever since I saw the miniseries, have admired your story – not just what you did, but how close you remained afterward. And I have felt a special connection to you as well, because you are from Illinois and I like to imagine that you are a Sox fan just like I am.

Thank you for telling us your story. Currahee!

Respectfully yours,

Erica 

We, the Band of Brothers

Now that winter wars had died away,
The summer peace has come to stay.
Give me a wink and a smile to remember you by.
That’s all I would ask, before we say goodbye.

Though there is one more thing that I need to tell you.
Just so you remember that I’ll never fail you.

It all began with us young men.
Just strangers, sent off to fight
Together. Together to train, to fight, then fight again
All through the morning; all through the night.

Our superiors would always say:
“To kill Germans is your aim.
To survive in doing so, is part of the game.
To our every order you must stand,
And be ready to obey our every command.”

We’d nod our heads and silently pray:
“Dearest Founding Fathers, behold how side by side we lie.
Whether asleep or awake, whether dead or alive,
We comfort, defend, and for our country, serve and die.
Because there’s no greater honor, no greater dream
For us, in remembrance, to achieve.”

Though years have passed, seasons have changed.
Our hopes had fallen, while doubts remained.
So much has altered since 1942.
We’ve lost heart, our legs, and so many troops.

We’ve often wondered: “Is this what war’s really about?
Is this the reason why so many of us rise, then fall?
For where is the glory in killing Germans,
Or killing anyone at all?

“Germans may have weapons, with anger – yet so do we!
Their job is to just shoot and kill opposing men.
So the reality is… they’re just like us.
We are no better than them.”

We’re all so aware of how much we’ve lost,
Yet what is it that we’ve gained?
We all know, and we all have seen
That due to war, life won’t ever be the same.

Such joy we felt when our battle was won.
Such rapture we felt when we were finally done.
It was that summer day, playing baseball as the sun shone,
When we were informed that we were free to go home.

My dear soldiers, remember me.
My fellow men, remember us.
For you all, I have such admiration, such empathy.
Let’s not forget our unity, our brotherhood, our trust.

We did not strive to compete, but to protect
Our soldiers, people and country; with respect
For those fighting next to us, and fighting for others.
Do not forget that we
Currently are, and always will be
That happy few,
That lucky few.
We, the Band of Brothers

—Andrea, Cyprus

I am not sure how to say this…without being afraid to be banal…
For the 20th time I watched Band of Brothers and this time with my mom. Every time I try to watch it with somebody different as I think the only thing I can do is to “spread the word”.
The men of the E Company don’t want to be called heroes. Either they want it or not, there’s one thing I believe we owe to them…and that is DO NOT FORGET what they went through, what they did, what they sacrificed, what they gave up to.
And one thought goes to my grandpa, he was in WWII as well but I was too young to ask him questions about it.
I wish he could be here now, I would have spent hours talking to him and listening to his story.
Thank you E Company, you left a deep mark in my heart, in my husband’s heart and in many many other people….I swear I won’t forget what you did and I’ll tell my children and to the children of my children.
May your memory live forever.
I love you all.
Grazie di cuore
—Valentina, Italy

I am not sure how to say this…without being afraid to be banal…

For the 20th time I watched Band of Brothers and this time with my mom. Every time I try to watch it with somebody different as I think the only thing I can do is to “spread the word”.

The men of the E Company don’t want to be called heroes. Either they want it or not, there’s one thing I believe we owe to them…and that is DO NOT FORGET what they went through, what they did, what they sacrificed, what they gave up to.

And one thought goes to my grandpa, he was in WWII as well but I was too young to ask him questions about it.

I wish he could be here now, I would have spent hours talking to him and listening to his story.

Thank you E Company, you left a deep mark in my heart, in my husband’s heart and in many many other people….I swear I won’t forget what you did and I’ll tell my children and to the children of my children.

May your memory live forever.

I love you all.

Grazie di cuore

—Valentina, Italy

One day this past May, my mom and my sister came home from the library. With them were a few new books and the first two disks of the TV miniseries Band of Brothers. I’m generally not really interested in war, but World War II is the exception. I’m still not really sure why.

A couple of days later we finished the first disk, and I was immediately caught by the hook. The first two episodes were so well acted out, the set looked authentic, and it was amazing hearing from the mouths of some of the real men of Easy Company, the ones who experienced this. The things these men experienced, from Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge to V-Day, just somehow really struck me. I know for a fact that I am not brave enough to have lasted more than a few minutes during what these phenomenal men did. Even if I can imagine the hardships these men went through, I wasn’t there and will never know what it is like to see a friend die, or to stay in the cold for weeks, or to be in any of these situations. And all so future generations could be better off. I just want to thank the men of Easy Company and mourn those who have been lost over the years. The world is definitely a better place because of you. You all make me want to do what is best in the world, more so than I wanted before.

Thank you.

—Anonymous, Indiana, USA

Men of Easy Company,

Before watching Band of Brothers, I thought that war was boring. I thought that I would hate watching anything about it. I was wrong. After finishing the series, I sat there for a long time, just thinking and wondering about each and every man I just saw on the show. I watched the interviews at the end, and I cried. I cried for the men who were lost, the ones who got wounded, and the ones who had to know life with war. I don’t even know where to begin.

Let me start out saying that I love each and every man of Easy Company. I respect each of you so much and I can’t believe everything that you had to go through in that war. I gained so much more knowledge about what soldiers, especially in WWII, had to go through. There are no words to describe how much I appreciate all of you.

Each character in the show stole my heart, and after learning that they were actually real people, my fondness for them grew. From Liebgott, who’s emotion at the concentration camp was so heartbreaking, to Guarnere, who lost his leg trying to help a friend. Winters, Nixon, Toye, Muck, Webster, Lipton, Martin, Luz, Penkala, Buck Compton, Perconte, Speirs, and the rest of Easy Company: I couldn’t imagine my life now without getting to know you. To all those who have passed away, I hope you get the peace you deserve. You were all extraordinary men. To the living veterans, I know you may not think of yourselves as heroes, but in my mind, and so many others’, you are. You’re my heroes. I love you all.

Love,

Emmelina

Dear Richard Winters,

Now you have passed on, I have only just realised how much respect I hold for you. You contributed to the war in such amazing ways, you taught your men well and were such an incredible man.

You will forever be a hero of mine, no matter what anyone tells me. You died a hero and an inspiration to both those you served with and those who heard your story long after the war ended. I am now, and forever will be, inspired by such a story.

Thank you, Major Winters, for proving to me that man can prevail in even the most dire circumstances.

Sincerely,
Caitlin

I know that before I’d heard of Easy Company I didn’t think much of the importance of friends and family or how strong a bond between two people could be. But, because of Band of Brothers, the moving interpretation of what happened to Easy Company, I now realize how I would do anything for my friends be it in a matter of life or death or even a simple misunderstanding amongst friends. Their experiences have influenced me to become more understanding of the world and to respect those lost many years ago. I even joined Air Cadets because I was interested in joining the RAF, but I realized soon after that it wasn’t necessarily my area of interest.

I’m not necessarily sure who I relate to most out of every one in Easy Company, all I know is that every single trooper was brave, strong and were involved in some kind of strong relationship with the others. Now I try my best to treasure my relationships, especially as I lost my father last year, and Easy Company has helped me keep strong and remain focused in my schoolwork and exams.

Thank you doesn’t really suffice for making such an epic and brilliant miniseries, but just the fact that Band of Brothers has – and will – affect so many people is a gift for you and the men of Easy Co. Everyone is amazing for creating this masterpiece and just… thank you!!!

Elizabeth W.

 

Dear veterans of the Easy Company,

 

I was given an English project at school which comprised of composing a letter to a group of our choice. Once given this task, I found that one particular group have stood out for me for years and this is the first time I am writing to people that I may not know in person, but admire.

My name is Tina and I am a 17 year old Spanish girl who has known about Easy Company since 2007. History has always been a passion for me and, in particular, World War II. After studying it in school, I wanted to see it from a soldier’s perspective and I picked up David Kenyon Webster’s book, Parachute Infantry.

After reading the book it opened my eyes to the real side of war. Webster truly caught the moment and I felt like I had been transported back in time into his experiences.

          Later, I discovered that he appeared in the famous television series Band of Brothers. Immediately after realizing this, I bought the box set and watched them all. What can I say! It impressed me so much, the effect it had on me was indescribable. As an extra bonus, there were veterans giving brief descriptions and points of view at the start of each episode which I listened to religiously. I believe they made the series as successful as it is now.

I have always wanted to show my appreciation to the WWII veterans because they did an amazing job and saved the world from the axis powers! (Even though my country wasn’t involved in that war because we had our own conflict from 1936 to 1939). For those who are still alive, like Babe Heffron, Hashey, Malarkey, Buck Compton ,Lesniewski,… and especially Bill Guarnere, I express my desire of meeting them someday face to face to hear about their war experiences. Also, I am really sorry to hear about Major Richard Winter’s death this second of January, because I believe that man was a true gentleman as far as I am concerned and not only that, but a great soldier who knew how to lead his men the best way possible, it is such a shame knowing that a true hero has just passed away.

I would like to ask, how do you feel after the toughest part of your life has become a successful show and your war stories are now well known?

I want to thank all the men who served and also the responsible of making such an accurate series that can be seen over and over again forever, and will be useful for future generations to keep on remembering the great job and performance of the soldiers, because the price for freedom could never have been there for us without them. May God always be with you all! Best wishes from Spain.

Tina, Spain

To the men of Easy Company:


I have one specific thing to say to you - Thank you.


Thank you from the bottom of my heart for the pain you endured - the sacrifices you made to keep this country safe.


Thank you.


I think on the camps sometimes and how close my family could have come to being shoved in such a foul place - if they had not made it out of Germany they surely would have perished and I never would have even been born. I have friends whose families were not so lucky.


And I think that without men like all of you - how much longer would it have gone on? How many more people would have died?


I cannot express the depth my gratitude properly, I wouldn’t know how to - and I cannot begin to fathom what all you felt - or still feel - but I appreciate all of it.
Thank you will have to suffice for the words I do not have to correctly describe how much I am grateful for everything you did.

Anonymous